rebelling against low expectations

Let’s Communicate for God’s Glory

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Recently I’ve been learning the art of communication.

In other words, I’ve been learning how shallow our words and actions can be. For instance, many Christians say, “I’m praying for you” when the reality is: they’re not.

“I’m praying for you” can be synonymous with “I have better things to do” or, “Oh, I’m sorry to hear that, but…”

Such a beautiful thing—prayer and the power it possesses—can become yet another Christian cliché.

At that rate, why even say “I’m praying for you”? How is it any more comforting than someone commenting on your Facebook post, “Sending hugs,” or “Wishing good vibes”?

Meaningful Communication

The power of communication is this: with everything we say or do, we are communicating. We are bringing value (or devalue) and meaning to something or someone. Communication without meaning is pointless.

Communication without meaning is pointless. Click To Tweet

There was one evening not too long ago when I was absolutely exhausted. It was 11:30pm. It had been a big, busy day and I was cold and tired. To be honest, I felt like a complete mess.

I stepped onto the elevator and gave a slight, tired smile to the girl already standing inside. The girl smiled back and said, “I was sitting behind you during a class earlier today, right? I remember because I couldn’t help but be envious of your beautiful hair!”

To be honest, I was kind of speechless. Didn’t she see me—I was a mess, right?!

I managed a little laugh and then said, “Thank you so much! That’s so sweet!”

“Of course! I mean it!”

I gave a big smile and thanked her again as I stepped off the elevator onto my dorm floor.

I couldn’t help but think just how much joy that little compliment gave me.

Words are flung around constantly.

Words can identify us (time and time again Satan’s lies will become what I perceive is my identity!).

Words can destroy us from the inside out.

Words can be beautiful tools.

Words can be ugly vices.

Our communication is vital because, often, it affects everything we do. And most importantly, it affects every person we come in contact with.

Last week, I began to comfort a peer by telling her, “I’ll be praying for you,” I caught myself, however. I knew that I wouldn’t really pray for her. They’d just be fleeting words that I forget about as soon as I left her. After listening to her story a little more deeply, I thought carefully about my next words.

“You know…I have a prayer journal. I write down the name of every person I know who asks for prayer. And then, I’m not perfect at it, but I try to pray through that list every single day. I’m going to write down your name and need on that list and I will actually be praying for you.”

It’s a challenge for me, personally, to actually mean what I say. How easy it is to throw out comments like, “I’m praying for you,” or “We should go out for coffee,” or even “I love you” and never actually mean it.

But my goal this coming week and from now on is to actually mean what I say. To be a communicator of God’s grace, love, and truth.

What if we all took the time to actually invest in the lives of one another? What if we actually mean what we say or do?

What if we all took the time to actually invest in the lives of one another? What if we actually mean what we say or do? Click To Tweet

As a closing thought, let’s read these beautiful, humbling words by C.S. Lewis: “Love is unselfishly choosing for another’s highest good.”

We are carriers of the Good News, we are a light on a hill. Let us unselfishly communicate for God’s glory!


About the author

Faye Lentine

is a homeschool graduate, college freshman, and editor for TheRebelution. She is an avid dog lover, amateur photographer, growing artist, and writer. Faye loves sharing the good news of the gospel through writing. You can follow her blog at www.createinmeblogger.wordpress.com

rebelling against low expectations

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