rebelling against low expectations

What are some of your favorite sermons?

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JAQUELLE WRITES: Sermons are such powerful tools that God uses to teach us. I can think back on specific sermons from conferences or from my pastor (who’s also my dad) that deeply affected me and convicted me of sin or inspired me in godliness. What are some sermons you’ve heard (from famous or unknown preachers) that have ministered to you? Why?


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  • Well, mine isn’t exactly a sermon by a preacher. It was my teacher who taught me a very valuable lesson. She taught me that God chose me. Me, with all of my flaws. He didn’t chose me for anything I could do. He chose me because He loves me. This was the first time I had heard anything like this, and it made a big impact on my life.

  • One of the sermons that really cut deep to my heart was “Useful Because of Weakness” by Ryan Fullerton. It made me realize that I am not supposed to grow strong (by myself) in a certain area before God can use it, but rather He uses my weaknesses to display His glory. The funny thing is that the message originally addressed men at a men’s retreat and I’m a girl but God used it nonetheless. I also loved “A Beautiful Design” (sermon series) by Matt Chandler.

    There are probably more sermons that I absolutely loved but I simply can’t remember them all. And I realize while typing this that most often it is not necessarily the words of the sermon or the way the pastor brings it, but the message reflecting Gods word.

  • One we listen to again and again is Paris Reidhead’s Ten Shekhels and a Shirt. You can find it on Sermon Audio. Also Paul washer’s series “The Glory of God.”

  • I enjoy listening to Ps. John MacArthur’s sermons. Here are a few that have really helped me:

    Knowing God’s Will (https://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/TMC105/Knowing–Gods-Will?Term=Knowing%20God)

    A Jet Tour Through Revelation (http://www.gty.org/resources/positions/P28/a-jet-tour-through-revelation?Term=jet%20tour%20revelation)

    A ten-part series on The Beatitudes (http://www.gty.org/resources/sermon-series/201/the-beatitudes?Term=the%20beatitudes)

  • My Daddy recently became a pastor this past October and I love all of his sermons! On another note, David Platt’s message he gave on Secret Church 10 was very educational. It really made me think more deeply on the importance of evangelism. Platt used an analogy that hit me hard. He said being a Christian and not sharing the gospel is like having a cure to cancer and just watching cancer patients die around you. Really that is what we are all doing. We are all dieing. Yet, some of us have a cure and we have to share it!

  • All my favorites are by John MacArthur. “The Ugliness of Christmas” is one of my favorites. It addresses sin in a very convicting and powerful way. I find his teaching challenging, thorough and complete with every point he makes backed up with multiple scriptures. I liken his preaching and his life to the Apostle Paul’s. He is always pointing people to God and never compromises the truth. He is one a a very few holding the standard of righteousness in this age.

  • The Fuel of Death-Defying Missions by David Platt, and Rethinking Outreach by Francis Chan have impacted me a lot. They’re very powerful. 🙂

  • My youth pastor, Joey talked about the book of Hosea. He asked us that we stop asking God to help us “do well”, but rather, whether we do well or poorly, that His love, glory and grace will be displayed prominently. God’s power is not based on our performance.
    I heard another pastor talk at a teens conference. It was so powerful. I think most of us were walking in with this mentality that we knew “all the stuff.” That we would be hearing encouragement and not much or probably very little conviction. Wrong. He taught a sermon, urging us to be different than the world.
    “Pshaw…we already know that!” I said dismissively in my head.
    It was as if he read my thoughts.
    He claimed that being different from the world goes much deeper than choosing to wear a modest dress, participating in young earth creationism vs. evolution debates or scoffing at the world in contempt and ridicule.
    “Those things only scratch the surface,” he said. How about giving up your life in radical abandonment to His will? “Don’t give God your modesty standards and perfect grades and say that that is what makes you different than the world!”
    Being different than the world means letting go of your dream to be a valedictorian at Princeton. Being different is putting on a hijab, going to a Muslim neighborhood and having lunch at a families house. Being different is not protesting angrily with signs and yells, but rather running up to hurting people and giving them the biggest warmest hug you’ve ever given anyone. Being different is radical abandonment.
    “Following Christ is not a remodel of our lives it is a complete demolition of our being. For He is the only one who builds us out of the dust more beautifully than we can do on our own.”
    Umm, wow!!!! Totally not what I wanted to hear at the time, but that sermon has shaped my life.

  • Pretty much anything from John Piper. David Platt and Francis Chan have some good stuff as well… My absolute favorites are from Pastor Scott Kay, a pastor in Alpharetta, Georgia.

  • Anything by Rob Bell. Anything Willow Creek has done… I haven’t listened to all of them, but the Old Testament Challenge sermons are really good.

  • Also, our pastor preaches some amazing, convicting sermons. Paul Washer is really, really good. Our family likes Ray Vander Laan’s DVD series “That The World May Know”.

  • My favorite sermon is probably the last one that I heard at my youth group, it was about what God can’t do and why those things should comfort us.

  • This was one of my favorite sermons, and is so important for many people to see. It’s titled “The Jesus Response to those who Profess Him, but do not Possess Him. The pastor actually gave this sermon at my church yesterday. 🙂

    https://vimeo.com/166805437

  • Ooo,hmm favorite sermons.Well really I can only remember the title to one right now rats.Their not in any order

    Reverend Lee Stoneking “Holy Magic Hair”
    Oh wait and his speech to the UN (well actually it’s his testimony) I recommend looking it up its awsome!

    Reverend Scott Hall ( about witnessing)
    My Pastor who is also my Daddy!
    Reverend Jeff Arnold
    Reverend Tuttle
    Reverend Joel Holmes. (His One God message)

    Sorry I could only think of a few titles.

  • The one that sticks out to me the most is one that my youth pastor gave at a summer camp I went to in 2014. He was teaching on the passage where God brought the dry bones to life and the thing he said that’s stuck with me ever since is, “no matter how dry or dead we are, God can give us life.”
    Or another time when my youth pastor was teaching on ministry and he said that ministry is about being faithful in the little things. That’s another thing that’s stuck with me ever since then.

  • One of my favorites if from a pastor I know(and am good friends with) his sermon called “I don’t know what i’m doing” but literally it’s funny(even though he did say a swear word at one time. but still his sermons are awesome! His goal is to speed the Gospel by saying, “Bring the King! Bring the King!”. He didn’t say, “The King is coming!” but either way I still like the guy, he’s the person I want to look up to.

rebelling against low expectations

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