Stories

Published on February 5th, 2013 | by Brett Harris

Do Hard Things: Accepting Your Limitations


Today we have an article from Madison Hexter, a homeschool grad attending the University of Akron, where she is pursuing a major in biology and minors in chemistry and dance.

Madison shows how accepting our limitations can set us free to accomplish even more. She writes, “Accepting your limitations is not giving up. On the contrary; it is saying, ‘Here is what I cannot currently do, but this is something I will work at to learn, and God’s grace will sustain me.'”

Accepting Your Limitations

Six other students in my dorm and I were doing math homework together the other night. Two of them are in Differential Equations (after Calculus III), two in Calculus III, two in Calculus II, and then me – all by my lonesome in Calculus I.

And I started to feel bad about myself and my abilities. Because I did not have a clue what they were talking about – methods of integration, finding derivatives, or classical physics (physics and calculus).

I was still feeling bad about myself when I walked downstairs to my dorm room and started getting ready for bed. But as I was falling asleep, I realized something. (Eureka!) I have limitations! Yes, it is true that I am “behind” in math compared to my friends who are in higher levels of calculus. They understand things I do not understand.

But I had a choice to make. I could grovel, complain, and pout about my frustrations at what I cannot do and do not understand.

Or I could rejoice, be thankful, and even glory in what I can do and do understand. I do understand biology, I can bake the perfect cheesecake, and I do know what commotio cordis is (a traumatic cause of cardiac arrest).

My friends can find derivatives, they can use l’Hôpital’s Rule, and they can do physics. But that does not make me better than them or them better than me. Paul writes in Romans 12:

“For just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we, though many, form one body, and each member belongs to all the others. We have different gifts…”

The “hard thing” that I have learned is you have to accept your limitations. After all, we are human. We are not all-knowing or all-powerful.

Accepting your limitations is not giving up. On the contrary; it is saying, “Here is what I cannot currently do, but this is something I will work at to learn, and God’s grace will sustain me.”

Accepting your limitations lets you stop comparing yourself with others, and start focusing on the gifts that God has given you.

“I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made…” Psalm 139:14

Accepting your limitations gives you an opportunity for teamwork, with each person doing what they are good at.

Accepting your limitations is letting God be God. And that, my friends, is far, far better than any method of integration, derivative or biology lesson. “…for it is God who works in you to will and to act in order to fulfill his good purpose” (Phil. 2:13).

+ Share Your Thoughts +

+ Like Us on Facebook + Follow Us on Twitter +

Tags:


About the Author

is co-founder of TheRebelution.com and co-author of Do Hard Things, along with his twin brother, Alex. He is married to his best friend, Ana, who blogs at AnaHarrisWrites.com. He is the founder of the Young Writers Workshop — an ongoing coaching program for serious writers.



Back to Top ↑